Communicating scientific findings to the general public is very important to me. Similarly, engaging people so that they become receptive to, or better still advocates for, measures to conserve our natural environment must happen if we are to overcome the inertia that seems so prevalent in today’s conservation landscape. Below you will find links to some of the articles and scicomm pieces I have produced. Many of these works were written for Remember the Wild and its initiative Wild Melbourne. These nature engagement charities have a rapidly expanding readership, and a growing portfolio of engagement and outreach successes. I am a writer for Remember the Wild and my works typically aim to educate people about aspects of ecology relevant to Australia.

The Conversation

Our Helicopter Rescue Mission May Seem a Lot of Effort for a Plain Little Bird, but it was Worth it

Australian BirdLife Magazine

Catching Hope

Australian Marine Sciences Bulletin

Frigatebirds Under Threat

Remember the Wild and Wild Melbourne

Catching hope: the race against fire

Threatened Species Day is an event, but extinction is a process

Seabirds that can’t get wet: the bizarre lifestyle of frigatebirds

Spot these 5 cormorants around Port Phillip Bay

Five reasons why shorebirds are awesome

Penny Olsen on the enigmatic Night Parrot and the people who chase it

The peak of cold resistance

Headed from the hills to a town near you

The fab five: finches of Victoria

There was still life in the old dead tree

A regent without an empire: habitat loss and the decline of the Regent Honeyeater

Magic amidst a multitude of stems

A different way to leave

I propose a mistle-toast

Are Abbott's Boobies heading for an anty climax?

Birds on the brink (book review)

The most important Ashes struggle of the summer: the Mallee Emu-wren

On death road

Come and sea the real thing: the pelagic experience (co-written)

Like a fly on the wall (book review)

New season winter arrivals

The joys of watching grass grow

Ecology is a dirty practice

Birds from the backyard and boyhood

A count that counts

A smile from a swoop

The Bulldogs are't the only good thing in the West

The vagaries of vagrant-chasers explained

It’s a long way to the top and every stratum plays a role

A cold winter in a box-ironbark forest is far from a silent spring

Listen up and you will never look back

Albatross amnesia

Eye in the sky: drones as tools for conservation biologists

Twitter outreach

4th World Seabird Twitter Conference 

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